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SMERT ©  Lifeline Process ©  Carol Robertson PhD  Psychosensory Academy TM  ©        

Carol Robertson PhD is a certified trainer and practitioner of Havening Techniques.

Havening Techniques is a registered trade mark of Ronald Ruden, 15 East 91st Street, New York. www.havening.org

Lifeline Process

Explanation

I developed this process to provide a graphic and simple way of

 

  • mapping your emotional response to events in your own history

  • mapping your emotional response after using a change process

  • noticing the changes in our own responses to memories and stimuli

 

Age>  One /           Four              Five / / /                          Six                                                          Nine  / /                                

Looking at this example of a person's Lifeline we can see a scale which notes the age when very exciting or challenging or frightening events happened. We can also see a V Scale on the left and right side in brown text like the ones shown here. This scale can be used to help us make a note of our emotions and to measure the strength of any emotion that we experience now when we think about those past memories. For example fear, anger, rage, sadness, grief, loneliness, guilt, regret, calmness, amused, relaxing, or happy. 

A completely level line would be drawn if the emotions felt now about that time period are completely neutral and calm. Some people describe these feelings are almost being bored, others say they feel objective and others describe it as a sense of calm wisdom.

The example above shows a Lifeline which has been drawn which shows a range of emotions when remembering certain events which happened in the past. Below we see the same Lifeline and the focus is on one traumatic event (see circled) that happened aged nine. Rather than using an emotional title such as 'accident in the playpark' he person has given this a neutral title so they can remember it easily, in this case the memory is named after the location 'playpark'. The person's emotional response to remembering this event is that it makes them feel 'sad' in the strongest way so they have classed it as 'sad 10'. The illustration then shows the Lifeline drawn afresh after Havening when the person rates the emotion as calm and steady and objective so it's marked as 'calm 0'.

Sad

calm

Playpark

Playpark

at grannies 

If the trauma had been before the other stressfully events then other later events may be easier to think about. In this example after doing more Havening the person drew a new Lifeline and discovered that it looked like the illustration below.

calm

Now remembers lots of fun at Granny, apples, watching TV, Playpark

Lifeline Process: ready to make your own

This process provides a graphic and simple way of

 

  • mapping your emotional response to events in your own history

  • mapping your emotional response after using a change process

  • noticing the changes in our own responses to memories and stimuli

    Start as early in your life as you can. Here are some questions you can ask yourself.

  • What was your birth like?

  • Early childhood?

  • The type of event worth considering are ones which had meaning for you, were at times when you were stressed (kindled), and were inescapable (in your mind or in a physical way). 

  • Another way to work is to notice things that upset you such as sounds, faces, places, scents, sights, feelings, textures, tastes, and scents. And think of the first time you encountered anything you dislike. Mark that event on your lifeline.

  • Also worth considering what you consider to be your personality, for example are you always busy, sleepy at night, a night owl, up with the lark, a go-getter, introvert, shy, bold, aggressive, raging, loving, emotional, sentimental, wild, social, hermit, jealous, easy going, laid back, bullied, tough, tidy, untidy, good at math, like the dark, hate the light, good at language, good at art, good at sport, poor at anything, obsessive, addictive, happy, free spirit, colourful, classy and so on. Think about when you learned these ideas about yourself and perhaps mark these on your Lifeline.
     

 

 Lifeline Process ©  Carol Robertson PhD, Psychosensory Academy TM